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Evening Along The Deerfield. August 8, 2012

Posted by littlebangtheory in Art and Nature.
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This evening’s skies looked like they might light up, so as the light grew low I headed down to the river.  First stop, the Route 8A bridge in the center of Charlemont, where the setting sun danced on the waters of the Deerfield river:

The light was nice, but the color wasn’t there.

After a few shots, I packed it in and headed eastward toward home.

But as often happens when  I pack it in, the light began to shift, and the colors bloomed, and soon I was accelerating past my driveway, heading toward a riverside view in East Charlemont which regular visitors to this site might recognize.  As I drove the eastern skies lit up, and I hit the binders just in time to get these takes on the fading light reflected in the river:

Our river is unusually low for this time of year, and the bones of its bed are exposed to whatever voyeurs happen by.  I’m embarrassed for it, and wish the roadside weeds would dress it more decently in its diminished state.

But that’s just me being anthropomorphic, feeling Nature in a way to which I haven’t a right.  It is what it is, and it isn’t really my business.

Still, I hope this is a passing phase.  My river can’t stand very much of this without losing a good deal of what it once was.

Expecting Spring. February 26, 2012

Posted by littlebangtheory in Love and Death, Politics and Society.
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The fields outlying Northampton ought to be deep in snow this time of year, anticipating the annual floods which accompany the Spring thaw.

But they’re not.  They’re silt-laden from the waters of Irene, cracked and dried in the subsequent sun, and anticipating nothing beyond longer days and warmer temperatures:

The Holyoke Range recedes into the east, with Mount Hitchcock appearing as the high point, though it’s not quite that.

With nothing to melt in these parts and scant snow cover up north, I’m not anticipating much of a Spring Surge on the Connecticut river, the once-proud benefactor of the fertile farmlands of its namesake valley.

Again, I wonder what this is all coming to.  Change happens whether we participate in it or not – I’m not lamenting the change, but rather wondering if we’re causing it to happen faster than the rest of Nature can adapt.

This is a bit more of Elliot’s handiwork, though the foreground fodder was barely worth noticing.

A Late Summer Rain September 10, 2007

Posted by littlebangtheory in Art and Nature, Politics and Society.
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‘Twas an interesting day, weather-wise.

evening-small.jpg

After taking care of some of the business of living (house cleaning, laundry, bill-paying) I headed up into the hills (as I generally do when I’m not too busy) for a little walk-about in the Great North Woods. It started out like a walk in The Northwest, foggy and wet, the kind of weather where the initiated hike with an umbrella sprouting from their backpack.

But not long into it, it devolved into a series of intense downpours separated by steamy interludes. And I, being without a backpack sprouting an umbrella, got totally soaked.

I loved every second of it.

This was Life On Earth, an experience so universal as to be strange only to us folks who live in cultures which are privileged enough to shelter ourselves from the vagaries of nature.

We do this at our peril. Shelter ourselves from nature, that is, not expose ourselves to it. The culturally-induced fear of “catching pneumonia” or whatever denies us the experience of being connected to our world, of knowing the seasons, of feeling change.

But that change is happening, regardless of our lack of awareness of it. And most of the world’s people, lacking the resources to shield themselves from their world, are aware of the changes. And if they know enough to see how the changes are wrought by the policies of their governments, be they American or Chinese or Whatever, they must wonder what we Sheltered People could possibly be thinking.

We don’t inherit our world from our ancestors; we borrow it from our descendants.

Not original, but a thought I think worth sharing.