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Long Hollow Bison Farm. January 20, 2013

Posted by littlebangtheory in Art and Nature, Dinner with TCR.
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Down in Hadley there’s a place I like to check out once in a while, a farm where American Bison are raised. They’re impressive beasts:

Bison Eye

They’re big. In fact, the old bulls are HUGE.

And they take the job of protecting their calves seriously – don’t expect to sneak up on them unnoticed:

Bison Herd

They’re majestic in the snow, and look totally at home in the winter weather.

These animals area raised for meat, and if you’re an omnivore, it would be hard to get better meat than this – grass-fed, roaming big fields, protected from predators (other than us.) I know some people object to the practice of people eating animals, but since it’s more common than not with people world-wide who can afford it, I have to conclude that there’s something of nature in it.

I’ve been trying to get a more blizzard-y photo of them, but they’re an hour’s drive away, and while that’s close for us “hill-town people,” it’s still a dicey drive in a heavy snow.

Time will tell if I succeed.

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Piglets. May 22, 2012

Posted by littlebangtheory in Art and Nature, Love and Death.
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‘Tis the Season.

Piglets on a farm in Shelburne:

…here with Mom.

Here without:

…eating everything green it could find:

And accompanied by every barnyard’s Overseer:

They’re cute little buggers, but when they get bigger they’ll be delicious.

This is the reality of farm life.  Raise it, kill it, eat it, don’t get overly attached.  And please understand that that’s very different from not appreciating the part our prey plays in our lives.  If we’re carnivores, if we eat beef or pork or poultry, we couldn’t do better than patronizing the family farms dotting our countryside.  Locally, it’s not cages and cubicles, it’s not force-feeding of the wrong stuff.  It’s green grass and sunshine and attentive care from people who are committed to something much more sustainable than Factory Farms.

Cute piggies become delicious pork, and fuzzy chicks end their days on a spit over a barbecue pit. It’s called a “food chain,” and we’re a link in it.  Understanding that is important to either accepting it or changing it.