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Anza-Borrego, Part II. April 13, 2009

Posted by littlebangtheory in Art and Nature.
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5 comments

So where were we?

Ah yes, down in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park.

Battling the wind.

But gawd it was gorgeous.

“Toto, I don’t think we’re in Massachusetts anymore!”

Visitor Center and Restrooms, 100 yards that-a-way!

a-b sign

The restrooms were a bit rustic, but the Visitor Center was really informative and staffed with very helpful people.  Couple that with the area’s user-friendly Rules Of Engagement (i.e., camp wherever you want, just don’t mess it up or cause problems,) and this proved to be a low-stress place to pass a couple of days.

And oh, did I mention that it was gorgeous?

a-b boulder field

…even though my bum ankle protested with every step across this particularly rocky patch.

a-b stony ground

But the ocotillos in bloom were mesmerizing, swaying like sirens in the long light of a desert dawn:

a-b ocotillo

…with their luminescent blossoms like bugs at a banquet:

ocotillo blossom

Even in repose the ocotillo has something to say, here through a little sprig of desert sand verbena:

phacilia and ocotillo

or is that phacilia?

We spent mornings and evenings looking for photos, and mid-days exploring, which of course involved taking photos.  ‘Cause that’s why we were there.

A ranger had mentioned that there were flowers blooming in Hawk Canyon, so we went and looked.

Yup, them’s flowers all right…

desert sunflowers

Desert Sunflowers, with a smattering of Desert Lupines.

Everything out here has “desert” as its first name.

The canyon provided some welcome shade (even in early March!)  There was a picnic spot with a fire grate, and a cryptic sign:

no wool gathering

Here Lizz is contemplating the ban on “rock” climbing as she surveys the vertical gravel of the canyon wall.

The narrows at the head of the canyon were choked with desert (!) lavender, in these parts a woody bush growing  substantially larger than a person, and very fragrant:

desert lavender

…and the ubiquitous brittlebush:

little brittlescape

There’ll be a few more of these before we head back north to J-Tree and beyond.