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Trinity Church. November 4, 2012

Posted by littlebangtheory in Art and Nature.
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2 comments

This afternoon I stopped by the Trinity Church in Shelburne Falls and shot this detail:

Actually, I shot a larger chunk of this building, liking the geometry of it, and cropped this detail out of it. I may put up some different crops of this same image, as sometimes looking at the parts  of a thing informs you about the thing.

UPDATE:

Here’s a different crop, using the same 2:3 aspect ratio as the original photo and the version shown above:

At the expense of losing the corbelled corner at the right of the first photo (which I liked,) this take echoes the proportions of the window, which I think focuses more attention on it. I also adjusted the blacks a bit.

What do you  think?

Country Boy, Cityscape. February 13, 2012

Posted by littlebangtheory in Art and Nature, Politics and Society.
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6 comments

Today I had occasion to travel to Albany, New York – ostensibly a two hour drive, though reality intervened to make it three.  Chalk it up to emergency road closures and a lack of maps on my part (hey, I’m a guy!)

Anyway, I went to answer phones at a thrice-anual fund drive for my local favorite radio station, WAMC.

Yeah, I know – local, but three hours away.  What can I say?  They’re amazing enough to deserve the pilgrimage and several hours of my life answering phones and writing down the pertinent information.

But as this post’s title implies, this hunter of landscapes found himself in an altogether different environment, and after serving my term on the pledge phones, I hit the streets looking for visual statements which would do this humble Capitol City proud.

Now, it was really cold and windy, so the colorful and intimate stuff seemed unlikely (and unpleasant,) so I set my sights on cityscapes which I could snag from my driver’s seat, or some reasonably close platform.  I came up with these images of I know not what – the streets were sparsely labeled and the buildings more pronouncedly so, and I really had no idea what I was looking at!

An edifice of State government, judging by the county names inscribed on its face:

Someplace Important, judging by its columns:

A skyline of buildings which I believe are part of the University of Albany:

…and another shot of some artsy buildings which are probably associated with some institution of higher learning and lower practicality:

Sorry for the ambiguity, but I was mapless and wandering and a bit out of my element.

All of these are from Elliot, with a butt-load of shift, a little swing and no filters, hand-held and hoping.

Ruby Tuesday! December 21, 2009

Posted by littlebangtheory in Ruby Tuesday!.
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10 comments

The enclosed ramp connecting the second stories of two buildings at the Lamson Goodnow cuttlery factory in Shelburne Falls cuts a dramatic curve across the evening sky:

This photo comes from Elliot; I used a serious amount of shift as well as a skewed objective lens tilt.

I might be getting the hang of this.

For more rubiliciousness, visit Mary over at  Work of the Poet.  🙂

A Little Architecture. February 7, 2009

Posted by littlebangtheory in Art and Nature.
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The other night, passing through the University of Massachusetts, I had occasion to try out a new lens, one with the capability to see a larger expanse of horizon, which I hope will serve me in my search for landscapes:

moon over the zoo

This, and the rest, were hand-held, and as such were meant to give me a feel for the scope of the lens rather than the quality of its images, which are reportedly superb.  But at ISO 1600, I was more interested in seeing how a 16mm perspective rendered some common scenes.

I liked the effect on that one; slightly surreal in its propensity to imply a vanishing point without imparting actual fish-eye distortion.

I stopped by their central heating plant, which I found visually interesting:

heating 2

Again, the hand-held, high-ISO result was grainy  but the composition was a bit more inclusive considering my distance from the subject, and I liked the effect.

I also tried my new employee in the interior of a commercial building (actually, on the way out of a dentist appointment) where an Escher-esque stairway offered an opportunity to play with establishing verticality, a process which is a basic building block in my crude interpretation of the photographic art:

interior stairs

Again, the slightly altered field of view delivers a result which more closely approximates the human eye’s facility with registering what’s dancing in the periphery, though we’ve learned to ignore it in our conscious lives.

I think I’m gonna like this lens.  I think it’s going to help me see more clearly what strikes me about a scene, and to recognize the part played by context in my transfer of reality as I see it, to the canvas as you see it.