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At The Rowe Fen. June 13, 2012

Posted by littlebangtheory in Uncategorized.
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Up in Rowe, MA sits a fen, or basic pH bog, which hosts many hundreds of Northern Pitcher plants (Sarracenia purpurea.)   I’ve been there uncounted times over the past years to photograph them, with varying degrees of success.

Well, you know, one doesn’t improve by being satisfied with where one’s at.

So today I went back, arriving in late afternoon to find wonderful light slanting through the treetops.

Blue Flag irises separate the fen from the gravel road, and though they were nearly gone by, they were still worthy of a photo:

There’s an Eastern Tiger Swallowtail lighting on the iris just left of center, though it’s hard to see at this size.

In the grass at the fen’s edge, I got this shot of a sluggish butterfly, which looks something like a black Swallowtail, though it’s wings lack the definitive posterior points:

That could be a sign of old age or disease, as the wings tend to deteriorate with age.

The Northern Pitchers were gorgeous in the warm afternoon light, glowing as though illuminated from within:

Their totally unique flowers were red as roses and ripe with last night’s rain:

Before packing up my kit, I got all Artsy-Fartsy and took a couple of 1 second panning shots, hoping for something impressionistic.  While the results of this sort of experimentation aren’t that predictable to me, they were close to what I’d hoped for:

…and:

The first shot in this post is from Elliot, the rest are from Gizmo with a 2X Tele-Extender, giving an effective focal length of 800mm, albeit without auto focus or image stabilization.  I used Live View/mirror lock-up and a two second delay to get steady shots.

Up next:  some animal shots, which have been piling up embarrassingly in my to-post pile.

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Comments»

1. emdoyle - June 14, 2012

I love the light in the first one and the Northern Pitchers are beautiful. I have never heard of them, or seen them – I really liked the flowers; they looked almost wooden, carved.

2. jomegat - June 14, 2012

Pitcher plants are on my still-haven’t-seen-in-person list. One of these days!

3. TheCunningRunt - June 14, 2012

emdoyle, the flowers of the Northern pitcher plants are unique among what I’ve seen in my life. The outer petals are indeed stiff/waxy/wooden, and the flower’s center is a reversed umbrella, pointing its yellow self back at its center. I’ve never seen anything else like it.

jomegat, high bogs seem to be the habitat of choice. Good luck finding these, and if you’re stymied, come down for a visit and I’ll give you a tour!

4. susancrow - June 16, 2012

The pitcher plant pictures are especially nice in this group. The colors and shapes are so succulent.


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