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Warwick In Winter… January 7, 2011

Posted by littlebangtheory in Art and Nature, Love and Death.
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…on a January afternoon:

That’s an hour or so east of home, up by the Northfield line.  Lots of gravel roads and not many houses.  The forest here runs up into New Hampshire and down into The Quabbin Reservoir, so there’s a lot of wildlife of the larger variety.

No jobs, though.

Later, – R

 

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Comments»

1. clairz - January 8, 2011

This photo speaks to me, as it is so evocative of those icy winter days we used to love (when we were younger) in New Hampshire. Icy blue. Icy cold.

Stay warm. The people here in my adopted city in southern New Mexico will probably stay in today, as the projected high is only 58 degrees. Those of us from New England will know each other, out on our walks with our big smiles.

2. littlebangtheory - January 8, 2011

clairz, I lived one winter in Prescott, AZ with two other guys from Massachusetts and one from Chicago. Uncharacteristically, it snowed regularly that year and there was a foot of snow in the streets in a place without the facility to deal with it. We had downtown entirely to ourselves; my housemate Todd was prone to “blowing donuts” down Main Street, as there was nothing to hit and no one to object!

Enjoy your walk, but stay off Main Street. 😉

3. Pagan Sphinx - January 8, 2011

That is pretty.

I’d have to ask for directions to get to Warwick even though one of the elementary schools in my school district is there.

Thanks for your comments lately on The Pagan Sphinx.

4. littlebangtheory - January 8, 2011

You’re welcome, PS, it’s my pleasure.

Warwick is east of Northfield on the way up route 78, between Orange, MA and Winchester, NH. I could find it if I needed to, but in this case I just stumbled upon it.

5. lisahgolden - January 8, 2011

The blue is so ….BLUE! And I love that strip of light in the farground. I know that’s not a word.

6. littlebangtheory - January 9, 2011

It is now, Lisa – coined by a writer, and hereinafter to be used to differentiate distant elements of a scene from their more generalized background.

Thanks for adding that one to the lexicon, and for your many other kind words! 😉


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