jump to navigation

Ruby Tuesday: The Late Edition. July 21, 2009

Posted by littlebangtheory in Ruby Tuesday!.
Tags: , ,
trackback

…But perhaps, “better late than never!”

We’re back to the endless rains, atypical at best for a New England “summer,” and the only bright spots in this environment are the wildflowers.

So without further whining, here are a few I found with Ruboid Tendencies.

This is a little Who-Knows-What:

pink bonnets

Found at roadside, with myriad half-inch flowers on knee-high creeping vines.  The flowers look like Beach Pea, but the leaves are long and lanceolate, and the stems have flat “wings” running their length, which doesn’t at all sound like my guide’s description of beach pea.  Any ideas?

Here’s a shot of part of a just-unfurling (or past-mature and in-curling?) umbel of a Queen Anne’s Lace, with its distinctive Ruby central flower cluster:

curled QAL

The complexity of these compound flower heads blows me away – they’re nondescript as drive-bys, but mesmerizing through a decent macro lens!

And finally, an Irresistibly  Rubylicious Rugosa Rose:

Rugosa rose

Found wild in a pasture, as they are wont to be; they and their many close relatives defy ruminants and flourish in these parts.

Thanks to Mary over at Work of the Poet (“Hi, Mary!”) for this delicious Ruby meme – go there and browse the many other blogs who participate in this weekly rubyfest!

Advertisements

Comments»

1. srp - July 21, 2009

Beautiful flowers… I was thinking something in the sweet pea family for the first one but I don’t know.

2. magicalmysticalteacher - July 22, 2009

Rosa rugosa
up in the high hill pasture
honeybee fodder

My Ruby Tuesday

3. Carletta - July 22, 2009

Gorgeous shots!
That first one is almost orchid like. It’s delicate whatever the name. 🙂
I have to be honest and say I never knew Queen Anne’s Lace had a red center. I’m taking my camera down by the roadside this week.
Yours is a wonderful macro full of detail.

I haven’t been here in ages and I’ve missed so much – love the river below and the foxes – terrific stuff!

4. littlebangtheory - July 22, 2009

SRP, Carlotta, thanks! 🙂

Yes, that red central flower differentiates QAL (“wild carrot,” with an edible root,) from Poison Hemlock, the identical root of which will kill with only a bite. I eat LOTS of wild edibles (I call it “the Hundred Yard Diet,”) but avoid things with dangerous close look-alikes, including many (but not all) edible mushrooms!

mmt, your replies always make me smile- I seldom think in poetic terms these days.

5. maryt/theteach - July 22, 2009

These are so marvelous! But I don’t know any of them. Knowing their names helps a lot! Thanks participants! 🙂

6. littlebangtheory - July 22, 2009

Yer welcome, Teach! 🙂

7. sherry - July 23, 2009

looks like the sweetpea flowers my parents had in their yard since before i was born. nonedible peapods. pretty flowers.

8. Hill - July 23, 2009

So, so jealous of your rain.

We’re in “exceptional drought” conditions. Not a wildflower or blade of green grass anywhere. Even centuries-old trees are dying for lack of water.

That being said, those are some magnificent flowers! Thank you for allowing me to enjoy the beautiful color. It’s been a long time since I’ve seen beauty like that.

🙂

9. littlebangtheory - July 23, 2009

It’s my pleasure, Hill! 🙂 See?


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: